imaginingcities:

What if? Cartoon by urbanist and illustrator Dhiru Thadan. 

imaginingcities:

What if? Cartoon by urbanist and illustrator Dhiru Thadan. 

(via npr)


wetheurban:

ART: Sky Art Illustrations by Thomas Lamadieu

Genius French artist Thomas Lamadieu has illustrated a series of scenes in the sky directly onto photographs of urban landscapes.

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(via npr)

policymic:

How an 11-year-old girl helped McDonald’s stop gender stereotyping

A Connecticut teenager has forced McDonalds to finally address the casual sexism that has long been a part of Happy Meals.

This impressive narrative comes courtesy of Antonia Ayres-Brown, who first approached the fast food chain five years ago when she was barely a tween. She wanted to know why the chain automatically assumes a girl will want a doll-type toy while a boy will want something more stereotypically masculine, like an action hero. In December, she finally received an answer — from the chain’s corporate office, no less.

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policymic:

This is the world’s first endangered song. Only 400 copies exist, and they’ll soon disintegrate

The Smithsonian National Zoological Park Conservation Biology Institute mailed 400 specially selected people a polycarbonate record from hit band Portugal. The Man with a song called “Sumatran Tiger” on it. It wasn’t anywhere online. In fact, there wasn’t a single digital copy of the song in existence. And the polycarbonate would disintegrate after several spins.

It’s a clever metaphor for what’s become of the song’s titular tiger and what role people an Internet away can play in saving the animal. There are only 400 Sumatran tigers left on the planet. That’s mostly because the commercial market for the tigers is robust. Poaching accounts for over 78% of the tigers’ annual deaths — at least 40 deaths per year. That means that in fewer than 10 years, there could be no Sumatran tigers left. The World Wildlife foundation has labeled the Indonesian species “critically endangered.”

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cross-connect:

ANDREY REMNEV

The process of creation for me is first of all a dialogue with myself. Search of a perfect artistic shape, its technical realisation is in fact a process of self-knowledge and self-development.

Selected by Andrew

Until the day she found herself checked in to Vanderbilt Hospital’s Psychiatric Center, Sarah Thomas referred to a drunken sexual assault at the end of her freshman year of college as simply a “very bad night.” When her psychiatrist instead used the R-word to discuss to the incident, she was taken aback.

"I never had considered myself a rape victim," Thomas wrote in a piece detailing her experience for xoJane. "Can you call it ‘rape’ if he makes you an omelet in the morning?"

In all, it took Thomas 10 years to fully acknowledge that the night was more than “a bad memory,” and to call the evening what it really was: rape.

Thomas’ story is familiar to many. Every year, thousands of young men and women have very bad nights. These are nights that legally fall within the definitions of rape or sexual assault, but because they weren’t violent, didn’t involve the heteronormative definition of sex or were so clouded by alcohol or fear that consent was never explicitly denied — are not characterized as a crime, even by the survivor.

The frequent confusion and denial surrounding sexual assault make up the basis of a forthcoming study in the journal Gender & Society, in which sociologist Heather Hlavka concludes that sexual violence and harassment are considered part of everyday life for many middle and high school-aged girls. Hlavka interviewed 100 youths between the ages of three and 17 years old, and found that they frequently wrote off harassment and abuse, noting the female subject “overwhelmingly described [it] as ‘normal stuff’ that ‘guys do.’”

Rape and sexual assault are among the most under-reported crimes in the world, but until now little consideration has been given to the fact that some survivors don’t report because they do not realize that they were raped in the first place.

policymic:

That about sums up our student loan system

There’s a stark difference between the ways U.S. and UK students pay for college. In the UK, tuition costs are capped at a maximum of about $15,150, which doesn’t need to be paid up front or until after graduation. If funded by English or Welsh funding bodies, students don’t need to pay until they’re earning over $35,350 and the amount owed is tailored to their income. Someone earning around $50,500 would pay $1,353 yearly for their loans. If it’s not paid off in 30 years, it’s written off entirely. Meanwhile, tuition in Scotland is entirely free for students who study in the home country.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

That about sums up our student loan system

There’s a stark difference between the ways U.S. and UK students pay for college. In the UK, tuition costs are capped at a maximum of about $15,150, which doesn’t need to be paid up front or until after graduation. If funded by English or Welsh funding bodies, students don’t need to pay until they’re earning over $35,350 and the amount owed is tailored to their income. Someone earning around $50,500 would pay $1,353 yearly for their loans. If it’s not paid off in 30 years, it’s written off entirely. Meanwhile, tuition in Scotland is entirely free for students who study in the home country.

Read more | Follow policymic